The Median Household Income for St. Paul for 2013

As we saw in the previous article The Median Household Income for Minneapolis in 2013, Minneapolis differed greatly between the median household incomes for Asian, “black,” Hispanic/Latino, and “white” households. In a twist of fate, St. Paul is eerily similar to Minneapolis in its own discrepancy. But before we get to Figure 1, let’s recall the Minneapolis numbers.

Median Household Income of St. Paul for 2013
Data Collected from http://www.city-data.com – Data Organized and Presented by Urban Dynamics – Figure 1

42 percent of “white” households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand; 26 percent of Asian and Hispanic/Latino households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand; and 11 percent of “black” households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand. These numbers were for 2013.

Looking at St. Paul, we see about 39 percent of “white” households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand for 2013; about 23 percent of Asian households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand for 2013; about 22 percent of Hispanic/Latino households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand for 2013; and a little less than 11 percent of “black” households had a median household income greater than $75 thousand for 2013.

2013 Median Household Income for Minneapolis greater than $75 K
Data Collected from http://www.city-data.com – Data Organized and Presented by Urban Dynamics – Figure 1

Comparing the two cities, we see that “white” households in both Minneapolis and St. Paul are fairly similar at 42 percent and 39 percent, respectively. We also see similar differences between Asian and Hispanic/Latino households in Minneapolis and St. Paul. As Figure 2 illustrates, Asian and Hispanic/Latino households are performing at 26 percent each, while Asian households are doing a percentage point better than Hispanic/Latino Households in St. Paul.

And finally, “black” households are basically separated by a half a percentage point between Minneapolis and St. Paul. Either way, “black” households are being severely out performed by all other groups in both cities. And as the reader knows, Urban Dynamics has been focusing on such a discrepancy in the Minneapolis system.

Why are the numbers for “black” households in Minneapolis and St. Paul similar? That’s the question. Minneapolis and St. Paul are difference cities with different, but yet intertwining histories. It is easy to get caught up in speculation, but the bottom line is that we just don’t know. What we know about Minneapolis thus far is what we gleaned from the already established data. What we know about St. Paul is exactly this set of data, nothing else.

Moving forward, we will learn more about St. Paul and why the current numbers read the way they do. We will learn something about its Urban Dynamics.

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