Tag: Minneapolis

Monday Data Dump: Comparing Minneapolis’ 4th Ward July 2016 crime data to July 2017 crime data

In Sunday’s Data Dump, we compared and contrasted the 4th and 5th Wards crime behavior with respect to the crime behavior of the Downtown West neighborhood. From our observations, we first saw that Downtown West experienced more reported crimes, 262, than the 4th Ward, 190, and the 5th Ward, 261. Recall, we were comparing and contrasting a neighborhood against groups of neighborhoods, so clearly crime in the Downtown West neighborhood has been much more pronounced.

Second, we observed that the north side of the city experienced a greater proportion of violent crimes than the Downtown West neighborhood. In other words, we observed that the violent to non-violent crime ratio, i.e., violent/non-violent, was 30/70 for the 4th and 5th Wards and 20/80 for the Downtown West neighborhood.

But what happens to the ratios if we compare and contrast July of 2017 reported crimes against July of 2016 reported crimes? Will we observe a decrease in overall reported crimes between July of 2016 and July of 2017? And will we see the violent/non-violent ratios change?

Table 1: 4th Ward Crime in July 2017

Neighborhood Homicide Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft Arson Total
Folwell 0 4 2 11 9 14 3 0 43
Webber-Camden 0 0 4 7 10 13 5 0 39
Lind-Bohanon 0 1 1 3 8 16 2 0 31
Cleveland 0 0 1 12 2 7 3 2 27
McKinley 0 1 2 5 1 7 1 0 17
Victory 0 1 0 1 4 7 2 0 15
Shingle Creek 0 0 0 1 3 8 0 0 12
Camden Industrial 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 6
Humboldt Industrial Area 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 7 11 40 38 74 18 2 190
(Crime/Total) x 100% 0 3.68 5.79 21.1 20.0 38.9 9.47 1.05 100

(Source: City of Minneapolis)

According to Table 1, we observe that there were 190 reported crimes in the 4th Ward in July of 2017. In comparison, we observe there were 170 reported crimes in July of 2016.

Applying a simple computation of percent change, we see that reported crimes overall increased by about 11.8 percent between July of 2016 and July of 2017.  Of course, it should be understood that these results pertain to the 2016 and months of July. The data and percent differences do not tell us anything about the dynamics or systems behaviors of the 4th Ward, 5th, and Downtown West neighborhood outside of the months of July.

Moving along, we observed that the violent/non-violent reported crime ratio was 30/70 in July of 2017. Utilizing Table 2, we can observe that these ratio has changed. In July of 2016, we see that about 37 percent of the reported crimes were violent crime and about 63 percent of the reported crimes were non-violent crimes – 37/63 ratio.

To find the differences between reported violent crimes between July of 2017 and July of 2016 and reported non-violent crimes between July of 2017 and July of 2016, we can once again utilize our difference formula as follows:

4th Ward violent crime change = (July 2017 – July of 2016) = (30% – 37%) = – 7 % which means violent crime decreased by 7% although overall crime increased by 11.8%.

4th Ward non-violent crime change = (July 2017 – July of 2016) = (70% – 63%) = 7% which means non-violent crime increased by 7% while overall crime increased by 11.8%.

A deeper analysis of the data would be required to see which crimes contributed to the 11.8 percent increase in overall crime.

Table 2: 4th Ward Crime in July 2016

Neighborhood Homicide Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft Arson Total
Folwell 0 1 4 10 3 15 5 0 38
Webber-Camden 0 2 6 11 5 8 4 0 36
Lind-Bohanon 0 1 4 6 7 6 6 0 30
Cleveland 1 0 1 3 5 7 4 21
McKinley 0 1 1 5 4 7 3 0 217
Victory 0 0 0 1 6 5 1 0 13
Shingle Creek 0 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 8
Camden Industrial 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2
Humboldt Industrial Area 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
Total 1 5 19 38 30 52 25 0 170
(Crime/Total) x 100% 0.59 2.94 11.2 22.4 17.6 30.6 14.7 0.00 100

(Source: City of Minneapolis)

So what does all of this mean? First, overall reported crimes in the 4th Ward did increase when comparing July of 2016 and July of 2017. But of course this system’s behavior only provides an overall observation of the 4th Ward system with respect to crime. Second, violent crimes were 7 percent lower in July of 2017 when compared to July of 2016 and non-violent crimes were 7 percent higher in July of 2017 when compared to July of 2016. In other words, bodily harm crimes decreased while property crimes increased.

Finally, it should be noted that these computations do not take into account the geographical locations of the reported violent and non-violent crimes. To do that, the violent and non-violent ratios of each neighborhood in the 4th Ward would need to be taken into account.  For example, the most obvious place to start would be the Folwell neighborhood since it experienced the most reported crimes in the 4th Ward in both July of 2016 and July of 2017 (note: this exercise can be repeated for all of the neighborhoods in the 4th Ward).

According to the difference formula, the Folwell neighborhood experienced a reported violent/non-violent crime ratio of about 39/61 compared to a violent/non-violent crime ratio of about 37/63 overall in the 4th Ward in July of 2016. So violent crime was greater for the Folwell neighborhood than the 4th Ward in July of 2016.

Moreover,  the Folwell neighborhood experienced a violent/non-violent reported crime ratio of about 40/60 in July of 2017 compared to a violent/non-violent crime ratio of about 30/70 in the 4th Ward in July of 2017. So while violent crime increased in the Folwell neighborhood in July of 2017 by a percentage point, violent crime decreased overall in the 4th Ward in July of 2017 by 7 percentage points, and this isn’t addressing the dynamics of how these violent/non-violent ratios change over time.

The dynamics of this system, and the other systems in Minneapolis will be explored and illustrated in future blogs. For now, we have some facts to chew on and notions to explore.

Until then, do you believe local city council members in Minneapolis, and Mayor Betsy Hodges for that matter, are aware of such data? Do you believe their knowledge of these systems and how they behave over time is this sophisticated? And if their knowledge is this sophisticated, how do you know? What evidence do you have?

Data takeaways:

  1. When comparing July 2016 and July 2017, reported crimes increased by 11.8 percent in the 4th Ward.
  2. When comparing July 2016 and July 2017, reported violent crimes decreased by 7% in the 4th Ward.
  3. When comparing July 2016 and July 2017, reported non-violent crimes increased by 7% in the 4th Ward.

 

Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. He is also a professional member of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the International Society for the Systems Sciences and a scholarly member of Omicron Delta Epsilon, which is an International Honors Society for Economics. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

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Photo Credit: Tony Webster, Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

Wednesday Data Dump: The Most crime ridden neighborhood in Minneapolis in 2017

There are a couple of things to consider while sifting through today’s data. First, crime increases as the year progresses. This is a pretty common pattern in cities in the midwest, where temperatures change as the seasons change and there can be a 120 degree temperature difference between the middle of summer and the middle of winter. Second, larceny is the most abundant crime in the Downtown West neighborhood at 73 percent. Robbery is second at 11.2 percent.

Table 1: Crime in the Downtown West Neighborhood

Month Homicide Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft Arson Total
Jan 1 5 19 9 8 139 6 0 187
Feb 0 2 19 13 8 137 9 0 188
Mar 0 6 14 7 6 158 6 0 197
Apr 0 0 13 20 12 145 10 0 200
May 0 4 35 17 4 133 3 0 196
June 0 7 33 9 13 155 7 0 224
July 1 4 30 18 8 195 6 0 262
Total 2 28 163 93 59 1062 47 0 1454
(Crime/Total) x 100% 0.14 1.93 11.2 6.40 4.06 73.0 3.23 0 100

(Source: City of Minneapolis)

And finally, there have been 1,454 reported crimes in the Downtown West neighborhood through July 31st according to the data in Table 1. Minneapolis as a whole has experienced 13,511 reported crimes through July 31st. With a simple computation, Downtown West has experienced approximately 11 percent of the reported crimes in the City of Lakes.

Comparing Downtown west to the other 6 neighborhoods in Table 2, a simple computation will show that Downtown West contained about 38 percent of the reported crimes in the Top 7 neighborhoods. So two questions reveal themselves immediately. First, is it normal for Downtown West to contain 11 percent of the crimes in Minneapolis? What would the historical data say? And second, is it normal for Downtown West to contain 38 percent of the reported crimes in the Top 7 neighborhoods? Again, what would the historical data say?

Table 2: Crime in the Top 7 Neighborhoods 

Neighborhood Homicide Rape Robbery Aggravated Assault Burglary Larceny Auto Theft Arson Total
Downtown West 1 4 30 18 8 195 6 0 262
Whittier 0 1 6 5 12 59 5 0 88
Loring Park 0 2 7 3 2 55 3 0 72
Longfellow 0 1 6 2 12 46 3 0 70
Lowry Hills East 0 3 3 6 11 43 3 0 69
Marcy Holmes 0 1 5 2 6 40 12 0 66
Jordan 0 0 8 17 10 22 5 1 63
Total 1 12 65 53 61 460 37 1 690
(Crime/Total) x 100% 0.14 1.74 9.42 7.68 8.84 66.7 5.36 0.14 100

(Source: City of Minneapolis)

Downtown West was the most crime ridden neighborhood in Minneapolis. And it has been this way for sometime. This is nothing new. Although Graph 1 doesn’t provide contrasting, dynamical data with any of the other neighborhoods in Minneapolis, it does provide a few details concerning this system behavior nonetheless. For example, it appears as though there have been more reported crimes between 2014 and today than there were between 2010 and 2013.

This is indeed the case. Between 2010 and 2013, there were a total of  9,293 reported crimes in the Downtown West neighborhood; and between 2014 and today, there have been a total of 9,598 in the Downtown neighborhood (a 3.3 percent increase for those keeping track), and there are still 5 months of crime data left to report. This fact illustrates that crime has not only increased from last year, but it has been increasing for a longer period time. And so what will this mean for the Minneapolis mayoral race and city council races?

A couple of tidbits to ponder until the next data dump. Downtown West resides in Ward 3 and Ward 7. Ward 3 is represented by Jacob Frey. Council Member Frey is currently running for Mayor of Minneapolis. Second, Ward 7 is represented by Lisa Goodman, who is also up for re-election. Apparently, Lisa Goodman likes to put her already chewed gum in another person’s hand, i.e., Teqen Zéa-Aida, who is also running for the Ward 7 city council seat. Weird. Perhaps focusing on crime would be better time spent?

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News.

Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. He is also a professional member of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the International Society for the Systems Sciences and a scholarly member of Omicron Delta Epsilon, which is an International Honors Society for Economics. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: The Systems Scientist

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

Minneapolis crime pattern since 2013

With the Minneapolis mayoral and city council elections only a few weeks away, crime is still a top issue. How will the mayoral candidates fair and will crime continue to remain a top issue?

Graph 1

As Graph 1 illustrates, crime is seasonal as it goes through its peaks during the summer months and valleys during the winter months. What is also interesting about this graphical representation, besides the fact that it’s dynamical, is that it shows how crime decreased each year from 2013 through 2015.

You can check for yourself by aligning a ruler with the peak crime months of 2013, 2014, and 2015. As you’ll notice, the ruler is tipping downward, i.e., a downward (negative) slop.

But 2016 illustrates an increase when compared to the previous months and years; and it appears 2017 will maintain that trend of increasing crime.

Thus, you can perform the same exercise with the ruler with the peak months of 2015, 2016, and 2017. You’ll notice an increasing slope with this set of months, i.e., increasing crime rates.

Of course, the increasing slope of crime doesn’t appear to be as pronounced as the decreasing slop of crime, but the decrease and increase are obvious nonetheless. Something to think about with city elections on the horizon.

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News.

Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. He is also a professional member of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the International Society for the Systems Sciences and a scholarly member of Omicron Delta Epsilon, which is an International Honors Society for Economics. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

 

Minneapolis: Education pays, according to the data

Odds are if you lived in Minneapolis in 2015 and didn’t have a high school diploma, then you probably made less than $19,200.00 in that year. If you’re keeping track, that’s $10.00 per hour. Matter of fact, if you were the average person with no high school diploma, then the odds were good you made $18,165.00. In contrast, if you were the average person with a graduate or professional degree, then the odds were good you made $62,757.00 in 2015.

It is clear from the data, at least this data, that education pays for those who work and reside in Minneapolis. That is, earnings increase at each level of the educational ladder. Those residents with a high school diploma earn more than those residents with less than a high school education on average; those residents with some college or an associate degree earn more than those residents with a high school diploma on average; those residents with a bachelor’s degree earn more than those residents with some college or an associate degree on average; and those residents with a graduate or professional degree earn more than those residents with a bachelor’s degree on average.

In fact, it is striking how each level earns significantly more than the next educational level down. For example, there is a $7,092.00 difference annually between a high school diploma and no high school diploma; and there is a $21,812.00 difference annually between a college degree and a high school diploma. Of course, is this the case no matter what city data is observed? Does this educational advantage remain if one were to compare the north side of Minneapolis to the south side of Minneapolis? Does this educational advantage remain if one were to compare different parts of North Minneapolis itself?

But what if it were the case that education remained financially advantageous no matter the geographical local, i.e., any part of the United States (take your pick)?

What would this mean for economic policy? Do examples exist of local policy makers constructing such economic policy based off of educational data? Indeed, one data set is not enough. Are there counter examples? In order to satisfy the rigors of science, data sets showing such an advantage need to be illustrated to exhaustion or boredom, whichever comes first.

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News.

Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. He is also a professional member of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the International Society for the Systems Sciences and a scholarly member of Omicron Delta Epsilon, which is an International Honors Society for Economics. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: U.S. Department of Education

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

The Bright Side of the Blight Side of Minneapolis

As we know, the 55411 zip code, which is in Minneapolis’ 5th Ward on the north side of the city, has the most depressed economic system in Minneapolis. It has the highest concentration of condemned and vacant buildings; it has the second highest concentration of foreclosures (the 4th Ward has the most); it has the highest unemployment rate in the city; and it has the second highest crime density in the city (the 3rd Ward has the highest).

But we also know from our previous articles that the 55411 zip code is a subsystem of the Minneapolis system. This means that the 55411 satisfies the (3) systems’ axioms:

  1. A system consists of a set of elements.
  2. Elements in a system interact.
  3. A system has a function, or purpose.

It has a system’s boundary and behavior (how a system’s performance changes over time) for which condemned and vacant buildings, foreclosures, the unemployment rate, and crime are all examples of in this economic system. But how does the systems’ behaviors of educational attainment of the 55411 zip code compare to the educational attainment of Minneapolis?

Do the residents of the 55411 experience greater earnings with greater attainment of education? Is it the case that a person from the north side zip code would earn more with a college degree than a person from the north side without a college degree? Is there a correlation between education and earnings in the 55411 zip code?

Graph 1

As Graph 1 of the Minneapolis system illustrates, there is an obvious increase in wages as a person’s education increases. That is, the odds are good that a person with a high school diploma will make more than a person with less than a high school education; a person with some college will more than likely make more than a person with a high school education; a person with a college degree will more than likely make more than a person without a college degree; and a person with a graduate level education will more than likely make more than a person with only a college degree.

And so the question is, will the 55411 zip code follow this system’s behavior? Indeed it will.

Graph 2

Considering the sensitivity of the marketplace on the north side, this is really remarkable. And despite the number of adverse economic conditions in the 55411 zip code, education is still a game changer. The question is now, would this behavior remain stable during a great recession just like a few years ago? And would Minneapolis policy makers utilize this data?

Indeed there are obvious differences in earnings from educational attainment between the 55411 and Minneapolis. But the fact remains, this is a bright side to blight side of Minneapolis.

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News. Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: army.mil

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

Minneapolis: How do we partition a city into sub-systems?

By Matt Johnson

So far we’ve established the (3) systems’ axioms; we’ve touched on the notion of systems’ boundaries by using examples of cities; and we’ve established what a system’s behavior is by analyzing the labor force, average weekly wages, and unemployment rate of Minneapolis. Today, we are going to begin to partition the Minneapolis system into its respective subsystems and we are going to do it by ward.

In the next blog, we will decompose Minneapolis by zip-code. And in a future article, we will decompose Minneapolis’ wards into their respective subsystems – neighborhoods – which will introduce us to the notion of systems’ levels.

Minneapolis is a city with 413,651 residents as of July 1, 2016 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Furthermore, those 413,651 residents obviously live in different parts of the city. Those parts of the city are called wards and Minneapolis has 13 Wards. According to Minneapolis City Government data, each ward contains about 32,000 residents, which of course varies every few years.

This means that each ward in Minneapolis contains about 32,000 residents; those residents interact with each other; and each ward has a function, which in this case is to provide political opportunity in voting and representation, and allocation of resources.

Thus, we have just shown that all 13 wards in Minneapolis satisfy the (3) systems’ axioms:

  1. A system consists of a set of elements.
  2. Elements in a system interact.
  3. A system has a function, or purpose.

Besides illustrating that these 13 wards are systems, we have also established that these wards are themselves subsystems of the general system of Minneapolis. This is because we have shown they satisfy the systems’ axioms, they are contained within Minneapolis, and they have established boundaries, i.e., political boundaries.

And this is a great place for us to dig a little deeper into the notion of boundary. Boundaries can be fuzzy or concrete; and boundaries can be regular or irregular. In the case of political boundaries, which are the wards we are observing, they are concrete and irregular. If we look at any of the 13 wards in Minneapolis, we can observe that the boundaries of the wards are well-defined, i.e., concrete. And we know this is because of the Minneapolis City Charter. But we can also observe that these boundaries are irregular. That is, they are not squares, rectangles, triangles, or circles.

In this short blog, we established that these 13 wards are subsystems of Minneapolis. We also established, with the help of the map, that the boundaries of these wards are concrete and irregular. As we keep moving forward, we will see that our new-found knowledge of systems will pay dividends when we begin to compare and contrast the different wards, neighborhoods, zip-codes, and other Minneapolis subsystems. And we will do this by adding a new tool to our systems’ took-kit – systems dynamics.

Let us now, as we have done before, attempt to disprove our systems’ notions and work in the tradition of natural philosophy until the next blog.

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News. Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: The Systems Scientist

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist

 

Minneapolis: How is the city’s economic system performing?

By Matt Johnson

Over the past couple of blogs, we have illustrated the power of the (3) systems’ axioms (we will review the axioms very shortly) and we have introduced the idea systems’ boundaries. But in our quest to understand what a system is and how we can use system’s knowledge to find real-world applications, we must endeavor to keep testing the validity of our ideas while we add new notions to them.

In today’s blog, we will test the idea of an economic system against our (3) axioms with respect to Minneapolis. We will do this by introducing the notion of systems’ behavior via data and graphical representation. And in doing so, we will ask three questions to facilitate this discovery. First, does Minneapolis satisfy the (3) systems’ axioms? Second, does an economic system satisfy the (3) systems’ axioms? And third, what is systems’ behavior?

In our previous blog, we illustrated that Chicago satisfied the (3) systems’ axioms:

  1. A system consists of a set of elements.
  2. Elements in a system interact.
  3. A system has a function, or purpose.

That is, Chicago consists of a set of elements in the form of approximately 2.7 million residents. Chicago’s residents also interact with each other in various ways on a daily, hourly, minute, and second basis. And one of Chicago’s functions is the ability to increase utility and stability while decreasing crime and instability.

Thus, homicides are concentrated in specific neighborhoods and so it follows that the economic, political, and social systems will behave much differently in the Austin neighborhood, which has experienced 43 homicides this year, than they do in the Edison Park neighborhood, which experienced no homicides this year, for example.

Using the template that we used for Chicago, we can illustrate that Minneapolis will also satisfy the (3) systems’ axioms. This is because we know from U.S. Census data that Minneapolis had 413,651 residents as of July 1, 2016, which is our set of elements.

Graph 1

We also know that residents interact with each other in various ways. And finally, we can think of a half-dozen possible functions that Minneapolis might have. For example, we can think of three economic variables that will tell us if utility is increasing or decreasing in Minneapolis: labor force, wages, and unemployment. We know that these three variables can be systems’ functions. Thus, our (3) systems’ axioms are satisfied once again.

Now we can show if an economy is an economic system in a few different ways, but in this case we will use a similar approach to that of our city examples.

Indeed, not all of the 413,651 residents participate in the marketplace. In reality it is those residents who are 16 years of age and older. And frankly, that’s all that is needed – a set of market participants. It could be 50 percent of the population. Those 50 percent, or 200,000 and some, are a set of elements.

In addition, these participants interact with each other various ways. Some of the participants are employees; some participants are even unemployed; and some participants are business owners. No matter the capacity of these participants, they are still interacting in the marketplace in one form or another. The point here is that they are interacting.

Graph 2

And finally, does the economic system have a function? If Adam Smith and his books The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations are to be a guide, than economic utility (stability and vitality) is to be the main function of an economic system.

Indeed, this notion of economic system is more abstract, but the (3) systems’ axioms are still satisfied.

Now if economic utility is our function and we want to illustrate that function for everyone to see, how do we do it? Simple. We’ll do it graphically via data.

As we stated before, the functions of the Minneapolis system are labor force, wages, and unemployment. We also stated the function of the economic system is utility. Adding in the title of this blog How is the city’s economic system performing? we can now address the systems’ functions and question in one sitting through the notion of systems’ behavior.

Systems’ behavior – how a system’s performance changes over time – will tell us how a system is performing. In other words, if the economic system of Minneapolis is performing well, then we ought to expect to see an increase in the labor force, an increase in wages, and a decrease in unemployment over time.

Graph 3

However, if the economic system of Minneapolis is not performing well, then we ought to expect to see a decrease in the labor force, a decrease in wages, and an increase unemployment over time. For sure there are other economic variables we could consider, but for now, and for brevity, we will concentrate on these three variables.

If we take a look at Graph 1, it will tell us how the labor force of Minneapolis has been behaving over the past decade. So what are we observing? What is the graphical data telling us about the labor force in the economic system of Minneapolis?

Well, we are seeing a steady, albeit stochastic (probabilistic), increase over time, correct? Aren’t we observing an increase of about 20,000 participants in the labor force since January of 2007? If our observations are correct, we are seeing an economic system that is performing well in regards to the labor force over time.

What do we see when we observe the wages of Minneapolis in Graph 2? Doesn’t it appear that the average weekly wages for Minneapolis have increased by about $300.00 since the 1st Quarter of 2007? If so, then we are observing an economic system that is performing well in regards to wages over time.

And finally, what do we see when we observe the unemployment rate of Minneapolis in Graph 3? We see the unemployment rate decreasing from more than 8 percent in early 2009 to a little more than 3 percent in late 2016. Again, and just like the first two variables, we are observing an economic system that is performing well in regards to unemployment over time.

So with respect to the systems’ functions of the Minneapolis system, the systems’ behaviors via our graphical representations of the labor force, wages, and unemployment are telling us that the economic system in Minneapolis has been increasing in utility for the residents of the city, in general, for some time now.

Thus, we have shown that Minneapolis is a system, the city has an economic system, and that the economic system is performing well based off our established parameters.

Let us now, as we have done before, attempt to disprove our notions (systems axioms, boundaries, and behaviors) and work in the tradition of natural philosophy until the next blog.

 

Matt Johnson is a blogger/writer for The Systems Scientist and the Urban Dynamics blog. He has also contributed to the Iowa State Daily and Our Black News. Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Systems Science, with focuses in applied mathematics and economic systems, from Iowa State University. 

You can connect with him directly in the comments section, and follow him on Facebook

You can also follow The Systems Scientist on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2017 – The Systems Scientist